Technical Program: Divisions & Groups



 

Advanced Surface Engineering (SE)

The program of the Advanced Surface Engineering Division (SE) focuses on all topics related to  engineering the properties and functionalities of surfaces of all kinds. Both fundamental scientific and application-oriented contributions presenting experimental and/or theoretical and computational results are included. The session “Plasma-assisted Surface Modification and Deposition Processes” presents contributions aimed at understanding or further developing techniques and processes to alter the appearance of surfaces or to synthesise thin films and coatings on surfaces of interest. Topics related to analysis and characterisation of such modified surfaces are covered by the session “Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings”. This includes also contributions on new and advanced characterisation techniques in order to reveal further details. As thin films and coatings are frequently exposed to different environmental impacts, the session “Tribology: from Nano to Macroscale” will present fundamental aspects of friction and wear of contacting surfaces as well as the development of coatings to protect the underlying surface from environmental influences. Last but not least the session “New Challenges and Opportunities in Surface Engineering” serves as a forum to gather new ideas and developments in the field and to show its broadness. The main focus is on topics and contributions that show how surface engineering can assist to solve present-day and future problems. All invited lectures review and highlight the state-of-the-art and latest findings in the respective topic. Academic, industry and national laboratory scientists, technicians and especially junior researchers and PhD students from various disciplines and all countries contribute to our diverse and interesting technical program including four oral sessions and one poster session.
 
 


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Applied Surface Science (AS)

The ASSD is the premier gathering place for the global community of surface analysts providing a forum for research in the preparation, characterization, modification, and utilization of surfaces and interfaces in practical applications. ASSD promotes the development of accurate and practical methods to understand real interfaces. Our contributors will present fundamental research workalong with cutting-edge applied studies in nanoscience, materials for energy conversion, semiconductor processing, polymers, biotechnology, and more.

This year, ASSD partners with the Focus Topic on New Challenges to Reproducible Data and Analysis to address issues of reproducibility in Surface Analytical techniques. Session on Reproducibility issues in Quantitative XPS (AS+BI+RA-MoM) will discuss the challenges related to calibration, energy referencing, the accuracy of quantification, errors in peak fitting, and others. Three other sessions addressing reproducibility challenges will discuss other surface analysis methods (AS+BI+RA-TuM), data treatment and modeling (RA+AS+NS+SS-MoA) and a combination of multiple techniques (RA+AS+BI-WeA).

ASSD strives to grow in new areas of applied surface analysis. Invited talks covering techniques beyond traditional surface analysis will include such techniques as Atom Probe Tomography and Hard X-ray XPS. With this year’s focus on energy transitions, the ASSD program includes a session on Operando technique for energy devices (AS+CA+LS-WeA) and the role of surfaces in energy and industrial programs (AS-ThA).

 

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Biomaterial Interfaces (BI)

The 2019 AVS program from the Biomaterials Interfaces Division presents an interdisciplinary forum for the  discussion of fundamental aspects of bio-interface science and engineering. The BI program brings together recent advances made in materials science and molecular biology with sophisticated surface and interface analysis methods along with theoretical and modeling approaches for biological systems. Focus areas for this year include: Biofabrication, Bioanalytics, Biosensors, Diagnostics, Biolubrication and Wear;  Cutting edge Bio: Bio-Nano, Bio-Engery, 3D Bio; Characterization of Biological and Biomaterial Surfaces; Biomolecules and Biophysics and Interfaces; Microbes and Fouling at Surfaces; and of course our highly interactive BID Poster session, including a Flash Poster session Tuesday afternoon before the main poster session. We therefore invite submissions of Flash/Poster Presentations, which will be followed by awards for the best student Flash/Poster contributions.



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Biomaterial Plenary Session

The Biomaterials Interfaces program kicks off with the now traditional Biomaterials Plenary Session. This year we are pleased to have presentations from two prominent scientists who will present their cutting edge research on Materials and Biology for Energy Applications.

 


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Electronic Materials & Photonics (EM)

The Electronic Materials and Photonics Division encompasses presentations in any aspect of the science and engineering of materials, interfaces, and processing that advance electronic, photonic, and optoelectronic device technologies. Sessions planned for AVS 66 include materials, processes, and devices for advanced logic, memory, and interconnect applications. Methods to enable new device topologies and simplify process flows such as selective area patterning, deposition, and etching will also be highlighted. In honor of our late colleague Prof. Nikolaus Dietz, a long-time EMPD committee member and AVS contributor, we have organized a special session covering the materials growth, characterization, and fabrication of wide and ultra-wide band gap devices. Consistent with the energy theme of AVS 66, we have devoted a session to the electronics and photonics needed to enable renewable energy generation, storage, and transmission. Topics include low-power electronics, power electronics, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. We are also holding a session covering the latest advances in electronic and photonic nanostructure synthesis, assembly, and properties, as well as the techniques required for their characterization on the nanoscale. As in past years, we will offer multiple graduate student poster awards as well as post-doc travel awards to help create a forum in which younger scientists can present their work and develop relationships for the future.

 

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Magnetic Interfaces & Nanostructures (MI)

This year MI’s program features pioneering, and emerging results in topical areas related to magnetic interfaces and nanostructures. Particular attention is given to research areas in magnetism that are of strong interest to the AVS community providing functional intersection with other divisions and focus topics. The program will cover a wide area of topics ranging from chiral magnetism and spin orbit effects at interfaces to magnetism in magnetocaloric materials. The program covers areas of magnetism that are fascinating from a fundamental point of view, but which carry significance for future applications. In addition, we focus on the synergy between the research areas covered by MI and their role for the development of new materials and devices for the information society. For this reason, the program features a special mini-symposium on “Novel Magnetic Materials and Device Concept for Energy efficient Information Processing and Storage.” The Magnetic Interfaces and Nanostructures Division will be selecting the best graduate student presentation from finalists for the Leo Falicov Award. MI will also offer an award for postdoctoral fellows who will be presenting papers at this International Symposium. The winners of both awards will be announced towards the end of the meeting.and Storage.

 


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MEMS & NEMS (MN)

The MEMS and NEMS Technology Group (MN) program will highlight recent advances in the broad areas of micro/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), especially latest fundamental studies of novel materials, processes, devices, and emerging functions and applications of MEMS/NEMS, in various areas. This AVS66 MN program will include a focus on sensing, communication, and energy. Specific highlights for AVS66 will be microscale gas chromatography and microfabrication technologies for quantum computing. Our program will include resonant low-dimensional materials and parametric and nonlinear MEMS/NEMS resonators which create intriguing possibilities of integrating these devices with existing fluidic, electronic and optical on-chip networks. The program continues to embrace latest progresses in optical MEMS/ NEMS, micro/nanophotonics, optomechanics, quantum MEMS/ NEMS, resonant systems, CMOS-MEMS, mesoscopic dynamics and dissipation processes, inertial sensors, harsh-environment transducers, and MEMS/NEMS-enabled energy technologies, etc. It also aims to capture some of the latest advances in soft materials, flexible and implantable MEMS/NEMS for biosensing, bio-inspired microsystems, wearable and wireless healthcare.

 


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Manufacturing Science & Technology (MS)

The MSTG sessions bring together invited speakers to highlight the challenges needing to be addressed for successful manufacturing of next generation devices and technologies.  Our sessions are meant to generate synergy among scientists and engineers working across the spectrum of these technologies, including basic science research, metrology, processing, and development, to encourage everyone to keep these manufacturing challenges in mind as they move the technologies forward.  This year we are highlighting the areas of  Solid State Battery Manufacturing, as contribution to the Symposium theme on energy transition, and Quantum and Neuromorphic Computing Manufacturing.

 

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Nanometer-scale Science & Technology (NS)

This Division explores the science and technology that emerges when material is shrunk to the nanoscale. Researchers from around the globe will present their work on topics such as nanoscale devices and quantum systems exploiting nanoscale design and characterization. The role of nanomaterials in novel devices and  constructs is highlighted, particularly their surface chemistry,  energetics, mechanics, and imagery. Specific emphasis will be made on the the key connections between nanoscale physical and chemical phenomena induced in confined volumes as probed and manipulated by scanning probe tips, electromagnetic radiation, electrons and ions, as well as approaches to  harness these phenomena for nanoscale and atom-by-atom fabrication. The NS program particularly promotes novel physical phenomena emerging in these nanosystems, and their applications for quantum information systems, sensing, and other applications.

 

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Plasma Science & Technology (PS)

The 2019 Plasma Science & Technology program highlights state-of-the-art advances in plasma research, ranging from fundamental studies of plasma physics and chemistry to new applications. The latest achievements in plasma modeling, plasma-surface interactions, plasma diagnostics, atmospheric-pressure plasmas, plasma-liquid interactions, and plasma catalysis will be presented.  Other areas will include plasma-enhanced atomic layer etching and atomic layer deposition which will have synergy with the Atomic Scale Processing Focus Topic.  There will also be a special session honoring the contributions and legacy of John Coburn from IBM and two special award lectures by Prof. Jane Chang from UCLA who received the 2018 Plasma Prize, and Prof. Gottlieb Oehrlein from University of Maryland who is receiving the 2019 John A. Thornton Memorial Award.

 

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Surface Science (SS)

The Surface Science Division provides a forum for cutting edge and foundational research that involves solid surfaces and interfaces including gas-solid and liquid-solid interactions. We aim to understand the wide range of processes, which play out on surfaces and at interfaces. This knowledge  is critical to improve catalysts, find ways to limit corrosion, and even peek into the chemical processes at planetary surfaces. This year we include a special session on “ Surface Science in Energy Conversion and Storage” – one of the pressing concerns if our time. This session showcases this years AVS Symposium theme on energy transition. Surface science has close ties with other divisions such as heterogeneous catalysis, and the focus topics on materials degradation, and 2D materials. This close relations are seen in the program and encourage participants to explore science outside of their immediate sphere of interest. This year’s sessions extend from surface chemistries with carbon dioxide and water to reactions on alloy surfaces, single atom catalysis, and reactions with oxides. We showcase advances in intra-molecule imaging, and promote experiments under “real life conditions”, which are now feasible owing to advances in measurement techniques. We will host the Morton M. Traum award to honor research presented by students in the Surface Science Division.
 
 


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Thin Films (TF)

The Thin Film Division offers several core oral sessions, with outstanding invited speakers, and one poster session covering the broad scope of thin film topics including various deposition processes (ALD, CVD, PVD, MBE, PLD, sputtering, etc), characterization of structure-property-performance relationships, and applications enabled by thin film technologies. There are two sessions dedicated to ALD and CVD thin films, including precursors for ALD and CVD and nucleation, surface reactions, mechanisms and kinetics. This includes understanding ALD for 3D particles versus 2D wafers as is the topic of Ruud van Ommen (Delft Univeristy).New this year to thin films is a session on HiPIMS deposition for novel thin films.  Specifically to address this year’s symposium theme on energy transition we have two sessions comprising of thin films for energy harvesting, conversion, electrochemistry and storage. This includes an invited talk from Wyatt Tenhaff (Univ. Rochester) on “Enabling energy dense lithium batteries using thin film technology.” Additionally, we have thin film sessions on electronics and optoelectronics applications as well as new emerging applications.  We offer sessions on in-situ diagnostics and theory/modelling to understand the fundamental science of thin films and a characterization session to exploit advancements in techniques to analyze thin film properties. To address the emerging materials in thin films, we are offering sessions on metal halide perovskites and other organic/inorganic hybrid films and interfaces, functional films like ferroelectric and multiferroics, functional polymers and composites, neuromorphic and phase change materials, novel wide bandgap and ultrawide bandgap materials, and epitaxial films. Thin Film Division also encourages the graduate student involvement as noted by several high quality talks throughout the sessions including Bryan Voigt’s (Univ. of Minnesota) presentation on p-type pyrite (FeS2) as a potential low-cost earth abundant thin film solar absorber. Again this year, we will host a student-focused session to highlight the Harper Award candidates in which the student finalists will present their work in an interactive “TEDTalk” type of forum.
 



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Vacuum Technology (VT)

The Vacuum Technology Division (VTD) provides a forum for research in achieving, maintaining, measuring, and analyzing vacuum across a wide range of pressures, gas compositions and applications.  The 2019 VT program topics include: Vacuum Measurement; Vacuum Pumping, Outgassing, and leaks;  Gas Dynamics and Modeling; Accelerators and Large Vacuum Systems;  Advanced Applications in Vacuum Technology. The VTD Poster session Tuesday evening features the VT Student Poster Competition, where students of any discipline are invited to share their innovative solutions to vacuum equipment challenges. Student presenter awards will also be given for the best oral presentations.
 

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