Technical Program: Focus Topics

 



2D Materials Focus Topic (2D)

The 2D Materials Focus Topic will review the world-wide effort exploring 2D materials regarding their synthesis, characterization, processing, properties, and applications.  The presentations will cover growth and fabrication; characterization including microscopy and spectroscopy; nanostructures including heterostructures; dopants, defects, and interfaces; properties including electronic, magnetic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties; surface chemistry, functionalization, bio and sensor applications; device physics and applications; novel 2D materials; and novel quantum phenomena in 2D materials.
 



return to top

 

 Actinides and Rare Earths (AC)

Actinides and rare earths exhibit many unique and diverse physical, chemical and magnetic properties resulting in large part from the complexity of their 5f and 4f electronic structure.  The Actinide and Rare Earth Sessions focus on the chemistry, physics and materials science of f–electron materials. Emphasis will be placed upon the 4f/5f electronic and magnetic structure, surface science, thin film properties, and applications to energy–related issues. The role of fundamental f–electron science in resolving technical challenges posed by actinide materials will be stressed, particularly with regard to energy applications, including energy generation, novel nuclear fuels, and structural materials. Both basic and applied experimental approaches, including synchrotron–radiation-based and neutron–based investigations, as well as theoretical modeling computational simulations, will be featured, with the aim of explaining the observed behavior in these complex materials.  Of particular importance are the issues important to nuclear energy and security, including fuel synthesis, oxidation, corrosion, intermixing, stability in extreme environments, prediction of properties via bench-marked simulations, separation science, and forensics. Specific sessions will be devoted to a continued, focused emphasis on the advances in the theory and measurements of core-level spectroscopies for the study of actinides and rare earths. This Focus Topic will also address advances in chemistry/materials sciences for environmental.
 
 


return to top



Atomic Scale Processing (AP)

The AVS66 program will feature for the first time, the Atomic Scale Processing Focus Topic. This focus topic will provide a unique forum to expand the scope of atomic layer deposition (ALD) and atomic layer etching (ALE) processes towards understanding the fundamentals needed to achieve true atomic scale precision as well as synergistic efforts across multiple AVS divisions and groups to generate novel characterization methods to advance the field of processing at the atomic scale. The Focus Topic begins on Monday morning with a session on Area Selective Deposition and Selective-Area Patterning, highlighted with invited talks from Prof. Gregory Parsons from NC State and Prof. Sumit Agarwal from Colorado School of Mines. The program continues on Tuesday afternoon with a session on Advancing Metrology and Characterization to enable Atomic Layer Processing featuring multiple invited talks from Dr. James Hilfiker, J.A. Woollam, Dr. Jeff Elam, Argonne National Laboratory, and Dr. Andrew Antonelli, Nanometrics. The program then continues on both Wednesday morning and Thursday morning with sessions on Surface Reaction Analysis and Emerging Applications of Atomic Scale Processing and Thermal Atomic Layer Etching, respectively as well as the poster session on Thursday evening. In addition, there are numerous sessions on ALD and ALE featured throughout the week in sessions led by the Thin Films Division, the Plasma Science and Technology Division, the Electronic Materials and Photonics Division and the 2D Materials Focus Topic.
 



return to top



Chemical Analysis and Imaging Interfaces(CA)

Chemical and physical processes occurring at surfaces and interfaces, including gas-liquid, solid-liquid, and gas-solid interface are important in many applications and do represent grand scientific and engineering challenges. This Focus Topic aims to provide a platform to the latest developments of emerging techniques and scientific understanding using in situ/ex situ/non situ/operando imaging, spectroscopy and microscopy to investigate challenging surfaces and interfaces. The contributions cover applications in biology, catalysis, energy conversion and storage, environment, and material science.
 



return to top



Fundamental Aspects of Material Degradation (DM)

Degradation is an inevitable process with major implications for materials applications, process safety, and efficiency in areas such as catalysis, biomaterial performance, biofouling of ship hulls, and the corrosion of structural and additively manufactured materials.
This Focus Topic will promote interdisciplinary discussion, highlight common problems, and encourage the development of a molecular level understanding of degradation processes.

As invited speaker Philipp Marcus, who pioneered atomic scale imaging of corrosive processes, will highlight the recent progress in atomic-scale characterisation of solid/liquid interfaces and understanding of initial degrading mechanism of metals in oxidizing/liquid environments. In addition, Gerry Frankel will give an overview on corrosion science of high-entropy alloys, which are a fascinating class of emerging complex materials, for which surface processes are not well studied at all. Biofouling prevention, material stabilities and technology for degradation protection for bio- and biomedical materials will be discussed in a simulation-focussed session with Paul Molino as invited speaker.Finally, Serhiy Cherevko will provide insight on stability of electrocatalyst under operating conditions during electrocatalytic processing with ICP-MS coupled scanning flow cells. In this session catalyst degradation, dissolution reactions, oxidation and sintering will be discussed in detail by contributing speakers.
 



return to top



Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (EL)

The Focus Topic on Spectroscopic Ellipsometry integrates themes ranging from classical material science and thin film characterization to nanometer scale science and novel optical sensing concepts. We will host two oral sessions dedicated to traditional applications of spectroscopic ellipsometry in optical materials and thin film characterization as well as new and emerging topics. The first session will focus on classical research topics of ellipsometry as for instance optical coatings and inorganic as well as organic thin film characterization. Furthermore, presentations on the ellipsometric investigation of novel optical and electronic materials and materials with subwavelength structures will be included. In the second oral session we will host presentations on novel experimental and theoretical approaches. This  topic will also include spectroscopic ellipsometry for the characterization of energy materials in response to the AVS 66 topic “Shaping our future: Materials, technologies and processes for the energy transition.” As highlight, the best student paper, which is selected based on the quality of the research, its presentation, and the discussion during the symposium, will be awarded with the Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Focus Topic student award. A poster session will be also hosted.
 


return to top

 

Fundamental Discoveries in Heterogeneous Catalysis (HC): 

The Fundamental Discoveries in Heterogeneous Catalysis (HC) focus topic highlights recent advances in the understanding of the atomic and molecular basis for heterogeneously-catalyzed reactions on solid surfaces. This will be the fourth time the HC Focus Topic has been organized. This year, HC is coordinated with the Surface Science (SS) Division, and the 2D Materials (2D) and Energy Transition (TL) Focus Topics. Emphasis will be on facilitating dialogue between surface science-based and applied communities studying heterogeneously-catalyzed systems. In addition to previous session topics including theoretical models, nanoscale structures, gas-surface dynamics, and other novel studies of active surfaces, several new areas will be explored. New sessions will focus on machine learning and artificial intelligence, building catalysts inspired by nature, exotic surfaces, and as well as challenges for energy production in line with the Symposium theme on energy transition. HC will highlight connections among theoretical and experimental approaches with the goal of revealing key details of the fundamental chemistry and physics underlying heterogeneous catalysis. Of particular interest are developments in chemical understanding, atomic-level details, and predictive models of reactions catalyzed by metal surfaces.
 

 

return to top


 

Advanced Ion Microscopy (HI)

AVS 66 Advanced Ion Microscopy & Ion Beam Nano-Engineering focus topic targets research in focused ion beam technology and applications. This includes microscopy, metrology, direct-write lithography, nano-machining, and nano-engineering applications. Emphasis is on applying novel ion beam technologies to enable scaling, supplementing, or replacing existing techniques historically used in semiconductors, life sciences, and other nano-microscopy applications.   This year's focus topic will feature the following four areas:  Advanced Ion Microscopy and Surface Analysis, featuring talks in He ion microscopy (HIM), Ne & Cs SIMS, neutral beam imaging,  and other novel ion beam imaging - analysis applications;   Novel Beam Induced Material Engineering & Nano-Patterning; Emerging Ion Source, Optics, and Applications, featuring talks on advances in GFIS, Cold Beams, and LMIS source technology.



return to top 


 

Frontiers of New Light Sources Applied to Materials, Interfaces, and Processing (LS)

The increasing need for energy coupled with growing concerns about climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our society. Renewable energy is one of the solutions to replace fossil fuels, but sustainability imposes combination with efficient conversion and storage. Notwithstanding the vast R&D activities the technology has not reached the maturity to comprise the high-conversion and high-power range due to the fact that successful operation of solar cells and batteries is determined by numerous physical, chemical, electrical and thermal processes, occurring over wide spatial and temporal ranges. One of the most promising guides for solving technology problems is to understand the evolving device properties via in-situ and operando analyses and here the synchrotron and FEL-based methods have become indispensable tools to provide rational guidelines for technological breakthroughs. New insights into the governing processes that are crucial for development of engineering strategies for the next generation energy devices have been attained via operando synchrotron and FEL-based methods and will be presented by the selected speakers in the LS sessions on Thursday, October 24.
 



return to top



Complex Oxides: Fundamental Properties and Applications (OX) 

Complex oxides—including perovskites but also other oxides such as alumino-silicates, with two or more non-oxygen elements —are of rapidly emerging interest in current CMOS technology (memory, dielectrics), advanced electronics and spintronics, and in catalysis. These materials present novel challenges regarding deposition and growth (e.g., pulsed laser deposition vs. sputter deposition vs. MBE vs. ALD), and present exciting surface and interface phenomena—including the formation of two-dimensional electron gases at surfaces or interfaces, interfacial spin-spin interactions, all-oxide heterostructures for electronics/spintronics, and novel catalysts and photocatalysts. Contributions will be presented in both fundamental aspects and applications, with emphasis on Electronic and Magnetic Properties; Dielectric Properties and Memory Applications; Catalysis, including photocatalysis, heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis, in line with the Symposium theme on energy transition.



return to top


 

Materials and Processes for Quantum Information, Computing and Science (QS) 

Materials and Processes for Quantum Information, Computing and Science will cover topics which interface micro-fabrication, surface science with quantum information, computing and science. It will cover all devices, materials and systems that enable quantum information processing. These will include but not limited to, NV centers, Ion traps, single photon amplifiers, multiplexers, and advances in cryogenic systems, vacuum technology and microwave to optical conversion schemes etc. Specific sessions will highlight the recent advances and challenges in quantum science and information processing, achieving higher coherence qubits and SiC, diamond and related materials for quantum information sciences. A special session will be dedicated to the new AVS/AIPP joint journal AVS Quantum Science (AQS)  with invited talks by four AQS Editors with an overview of their research areas and their vision for the Journal.
 



return to top

 

New Challenges to Reproducible Data and Analysis (RA) 

Reproducibility, replication and repeatability challenges are appearing in new and traditional ways in most areas of modern science.  In a 2018 AVS survey, 65% of those responding indicated that they had seen or experienced significant reproducibility issues. Reproducibility challenges have many sources including the increasing demands of complex research, requiring use of multiple experimental and computational research methods, and issues associated with large amounts of data of multiple types. The Focus Topic on New Challenges to Reproducible Data and Analysis, in partnership and coordination with several AVS Divisions, explores sources and impacts of reproducibility challenges and ways to address them.  Overviews of reproducibility and replication challenges will be presented by invited speakers including a summary of a National Academies study on reproducibility (Dianne Chong, Boeing retired), assessing reproducibility in material chemistry (David Shall, Georgia Tech) and reproducibility in fundamental and applied science (George Crabtree, Argonne National Lab).  Some of the newer challenges and opportunities related to reproducibility and replication are associated with large amounts of data (and data types) and modeling. Invited talks related to big and complex data will be addressed by Anne Plant (NIST), Steve Wiley (PNNL) and Ilke Arslan (Argonne National Lab) while Wolfgang Werner (Vienna University of Technology) will apply modeling to analysis of nanoparticles. In many situations, the use of combined or multi-technique methods can help address reproducibility challenges as described in invited talks by Thomas Beebe (University of Delaware), Sally McArthur (Swinburne University of Technology) and Caterina Minelli (National Physical Laboratory). As XPS is the mostly widely used method of surface analysis, with many novice users, reproducibility issues are appearing in the XPS literature. The Reproducibility focus topic has partnered with AS by presenting contributions on Reproducibility Issues in Quantitative XPS.
 



return to top
 
 

Energy Transition (TL) 

The Energy Transition (TL) Focus Topic is being introduced in the AVS Symposium for the first time in 2019, entirely organized by young investigators (students and post-docs) within AVS. This FT aims to highlight the breakthroughs and state-of-the-art advances in the field of energy transition. Aligned with the symposium theme of “Shaping our future: Materials, technologies, and processes for energy transition,” this FT will feature invited contributions from eminent leaders in the field of energy transition and a panel discussion surrounding the ideas and innovations within the field. Our sessions will focus on fundamental discoveries in heterogeneous catalysis, advancements in applied surface and interface science, innovations in materials development, and implementations of these new technologies within living labs. To demonstrate the collaborative efforts of the AVS divisions and focus topics on addressing matters that relate to energy transitions, the sessions will be supported by the Heterogeneous Catalysis FT, Surface Science Division, Applied Surface Science, Manufacturing Science & Technology, Thin Films, and Vacuum Technology divisions. We are delighted that this FT will spotlight the innovative and collaborative work being conducted by distinguished leaders in the community and researchers who are at the beginning of their careers in interfacial science to address critical energy concerns.
 



return to top